[web-team] Details for September SVLUG speaker (Bernard Golden)

William R Ward bill at wards.net
Tue Aug 17 12:38:59 PDT 2004


Details for the next SVLUG speaker are below, or snarf them from
PenLUG's page.  (He's doing PenLUG next week as a warmup for SVLUG)

--Bill.


Bernard Golden is Chief Executive Officer of Navica, a consulting firm
offering open source strategy, implementation, and training services.
Bernard is an accomplished high technology executive with over twenty
years experience in starting and building world-class
organizations. He has previously served as a Venture Partner for an
international venture fund and has been Vice President and General
Manager in a number of private and public software companies,
including Informix, Uniplex Software, and Deploy Solutions.

He is a frequent speaker and writer on Information Technology topics
and has contributed to or been featured in major industry publications
such as InfoWorld, eWeek, LinuxWorld, SDTimes, Computerworld, O'Reilly
LAMP, Open Enterprise Trends, Enterprise Architect, and IEEE
Software. He is the author of "Succeeding with Open Source"
(Addison-Wesley, August 2004), which has been has been described as
presenting "some of the most valuable, practical advice I have seen on
how to transform use of open source software from an accidental
process into a powerful strategy for gaining an edge on the
competition" (Terry Bollinger, Author of "Use of Free and Open Source
Software in the U.S. Department of Defense", and a book which "walks
you through every step of the evaluation process, and provides vital
insights into the risks and benefits of making the open-source
decision."  (Kevin Bedell, Editor-in-Chief, LinuxWorld Magazine).

-- 
William R Ward               bill at wards.net             http://bill.wards.net
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Where a calculator like the ENIAC is equipped with 18,000 vacuum
 tubes and weighs 30 tons, computers in the future may have only 1,000
 vacuum tubes and perhaps weigh 1 1/2 tons." - Popular Mechanics, ca. 1947




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