[web-team] Upcoming SVLUG speakers through November 2001

I don't know Whatever at nodomain.com
Thu May 3 16:35:34 PDT 2001


Tom,
Thanks for the info.. I think web-team and webteam resolve to the same 
list. Checking mail archive, I've one from you for June about Counterpane 
talks agenda... Now this one is complete... I also have the info for Nov on 
the page, but hidden. Thanks for the great info Tom.. Appreciate that..

Winston.

At 03:53 PM 5/3/2001 -0700, Tom Geller wrote:
>Thanks to Winston for noodging me to get info about upcoming speakers to 
>the Web team. Here's the goods on all the upcoming talks. (I actually sent 
>something similar a few weeks ago, but it was to "web-team", not 
>"webteam". Duh. I wonder where it went?)
>
>
>---begin---
>
>6 June:
>Jon Callas from Counterpane
>
>Abstract:
>
>The Effect of Anti-Circumvention Provisions on Security
>
>Counterpane Director of Software Engineering Jon Callas explores security 
>design, copyright, and shows how the two can be reconciled. One of the 
>properties of digital Intellectual Property (IP) is that it can be easily 
>reproduced, modified, and transferred. In response, IP owners have created 
>creating new security technologies for controlling the digital works. 
>Inevitably, this creates an opportunity for those who can circumvent those 
>technologies. Recent changes in copyright law attempt to address this 
>on-going battle by prohibiting circumvention of these technologies. 
>Unfortunately, this well-meaning provision has a number of unfortunate 
>effects on development of security systems, including techniques that 
>protect intellectual property itself.
>
>Bio:
>
>Jon Callas is a premier figure in the world of Internet security. He 
>produced RFC 2440 (the IETF standard for OpenPGP), created the 
>architecture for a unified PGP and X509 certificates, and has worked to 
>get PGP software available worldwide. His current passion is the Digital 
>Millennium Copyright Act and its effects on security, testifying before 
>the U.S. Congress in 1998.
>
>He is now Director of Software Engineering at Counterpane, a Managed 
>Security Monitoring company; prior to that, he was one of the kernel 
>developers for the VMS operating system at DEC, founder of 
>meeting-software company World Benders, CTO at Network Associates, and 
>Senior Scientist at Apple Computer (where he was known as the company's 
>"Security Czar"). He still runs Linux on the 486 box he bought for the 1.0 
>release.
>
>
>
>-----
>4 July: No meeting
>
>
>-----
>1 August:
>Mark C. Langston, Chief Technical Officer
>Taos - The SysAdmin Co.
>
>Abstract:
>
> From the advent of the first digital computer, systems administration has
>meant coaxing software and hardware to efficiently perform a given set of
>tasks.  Over the years, the equipment, operating systems, and applications
>have grown more complex.  To effectively manage today's demands,
>an SA must consider and control not only the hardware and software one
>normally thinks of when using the word 'systems', but the people and
>environment in which these systems function.  This talk will detail the
>ways in which these components are also systems to be administered, and
>will outline the factors that must be considered to encompass this
>broader definition of systems administration.
>
>Bio:
>
>Mark C. Langston is the Chief Technical Officer of Taos - The SysAdmin
>Company, headquartered in Santa Clara, CA.  He has been administering
>Unix systems of various flavors and the networks that connect them
>for approximately 10 years.  He is a member of the SAGE Certification
>Policy committee and the Linux Professional Institute's Advisory Council.
>He holds a master's degree in experimental cognitive psychology from the
>University of Chicago.
>
>
>-----
>5 September:
>Still deciding (several candidates have been invited)
>
>-----
>3 October:
>Still deciding (several candidates have been invited)
>
>
>-----
>7 November:
>
>The Evolution of Public Key Cryptography
>Martin E. Hellman
>Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering
>Stanford University
>
>Abstract:
>
>In our 1976 paper, "New Directions in Cryptography," that introduced 
>public key cryptography Whit Diffie and I wrote: ìWe stand today on the 
>brink of a revolution in cryptography.î As with most revolutions, there 
>was also an evolutionary process that culminated in the revolution. That 
>evolutionary process is easier to see in hindsight, and will be the 
>subject of this talk. The talk also gives credit to some of the 
>individuals whose work is often overlooked, but whose contributions were 
>clearer to those of us working in the early days of the field.
>
>Biography (needs shortening):
>
>         Martin E. Hellman was a researcher at IBM's Watson Research 
> Center from 1968-69 and an Assistant Professor at MIT from 1969-71. He 
> returned to Stanford in 1971, where he served on the regular faculty 
> until becoming Professor Emeritus in 1996.
>         Prof. Hellman is best known for his invention, with Diffie and 
> Merkle, of public key cryptography. Prof. Hellman has also been a 
> long-time contributor to the computer privacy debate, starting with DES' 
> key size in 1975 and culminating with service (1994-96) on the National 
> Research Councilís Committee to Study National Cryptographic Policy, many 
> of whose recommendations have since been implemented.
>         Prof. Hellman also has a deep interest in the ethics of 
> technological development. With Prof. Anatoly Gromyko of Moscow, he 
> co-edited Breakthrough: Emerging New Thinking, a book published 
> simultaneously in Russian and English in 1988 during the rapid change in 
> Soviet-American relations. He also worked to develop an environment 
> within the university within which students of diverse backgrounds can 
> function to the best of their ability.  His work in this last area has 
> been recognized by four teaching awards, including three from minority 
> student organizations.
>         Prof. Hellman has been involved with a number of high-tech 
> startups over the last twenty-five years, serving as a founder, advisor, 
> and investor. In his spare time, he enjoys people, soaring, and hiking. 
> He and his wife of 33 years, Dorothie, reside on the Stanford campus.
>
>
>
>-----
>December 2001 and on:
>Still deciding (several candidates have been invited)
>
>
>
>
>---end---
>--
>
>          Tom Geller  *  San Francisco * tgeller.com
>bandwidthpr.com, openppc.org, suespammers.org, popcomputers.com
>Speaker Coordinator, Silicon Valley Linux Users Group (svlug.org)
>
>_______________________________________________
>web-team mailing list
>web-team at lists.svlug.org
>http://lists.svlug.org/mailman/listinfo/web-team

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