I agree it sounds like a good cause.<div><br></div><div>It's just that the subject is *possibly* incorrect in calling this a public school.</div><div><br>On Friday, 27 July 2012, Dan Murphy  wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
Ok, my 2 cents.....<br>
<br>
How about something like "working on computers at a school".  Unless<br>
its a terrorist school, or has billions of dollars, seems like it's a<br>
good cause.  (If they have billions of dollars, I'd expect to get<br>
paid)<br>
<br>
Thereby avoiding the whole issue.<br>
<br>
On Fri, Jul 27, 2012 at 2:49 PM, Paul Ward <<a>dssstrkl@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
> In a past life working for government contractors, its been my experience<br>
> that federal and state agencies are very particular about how they spend<br>
> their money. There's a reason why both the contract and grant applications,<br>
> as well as preliminary and final reports tend to be as thick as your arm.<br>
><br>
> The companies I worked for, OTOH, tended to blow money like it was going out<br>
> of style. Not saying my experience is the rule, but private industry has a<br>
> lot of overhead that government lacks.<br>
><br>
> --<br>
> Paul Ward<br>
><br>
> <a>dssstrkl@gmail.com</a><br>
> @dssstrkl<br>
> <a href="http://dssstrkl.com" target="_blank">dssstrkl.com</a><br>
><br>
> On Friday, July 27, 2012 at 2:35 PM, Andrew Udvare wrote:<br>
><br>
> I am somewhat in support of calling these public schools being that they use<br>
> public funding (and no, it would be better if it went to a 'real' public<br>
> school; government ALWAYS waste money; NEVER let the government touch any<br>
> money ever for any reason). I blame unions for most government failures.<br>
><br>
> Charter school are usually open by first come first serve. Does that make<br>
> them public? And a number of spots are often raffled because teacher's<br>
> unions HATE charter schools because charter schools do a better job and the<br>
> teacher's unions cannot let this information out. They call this being<br>
> 'fair' (as if a lottery can be fair). In case you do not already know:<br>
> <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michelle_Rhee#Chancellor_of_D.C._public_schools" target="_blank">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michelle_Rhee#Chancellor_of_D.C._public_schools</a><br>
> . You can also watch 'Waiting for Superman' on YouTube.<br>
><br>
> Just my 2 cents.<br>
> Andrew<br>
><br>
> On Friday, 27 July 2012, Sean wrote:<br>
><br>
> Good one. I agree with both of you, actually, but these do not seem to be<br>
> for-pay private schools for those who can afford it.  Understandably they<br>
> are<br>
> different from the usual municipal school district, but if still paid for by<br>
> taxes and free of tuition and (_presumably_) open to all; that's public<br>
> enough<br>
> to not be called private.  We could split hairs and call it 'alternative'<br>
> and<br>
> debate who owns the land, but the words "public" and "school" when together<br>
> not<br>
> sacrosanct.<br>
><br>
> Anyone can follow Christian's references and read-up on the back story.<br>
> There<br>
> is no subterfuge intended here.<br>
><br>
> FWIW I do hope to join this particular activity on some future occasion.<br>
><br>
><br>
> On 07/27/2012 01:29 PM, Christian Einfeldt wrote:<br>
>> Hi,<br>
>><br>
>> On Fri, Jul 27, 2012 at 1:04 PM, Rick Moen <<a>rick@linuxmafia.com</a><br>
>> <mailto:<a>rick@linuxmafia.com</a>>> wrote:<br>
>><br>
>>     Quoting Jeff Bragg (<a>jackofnotrades@gmail.com</a><br>
>> <mailto:<a>jackofnotrades@gmail.com</a>>):<br>
>><br>
>>     > I believe you are missing Rick's point, which is not about whether<br>
>> or not<br>
>>     > public or private schools are a good thing, but rather about whether<br>
>> or not<br>
>>     > the school Christian refers to is in fact a public school.  Rick's<br>
>> point,<br>
>>     > if I understand correctly, is that the school in question is not<br>
>> actually a<br>
>>     > public school.<br>
>><br>
>><br>
>><br>
>>     Regardless of one's view, Christian's repeated misrepresentation of<br>
>> fact<br>
>><br>
>><br>
>> Rick and I have a difference of opinion.  Neither Rick nor I have<br>
>> misrepresented<br>
>> a fact.  All the facts that I stated are true.  Any child in California<br>
>> can<br>
>> attend any KIPP school for free.  If KIPP is not public, who is paying for<br>
>> that<br>
>> child's tuition?  Answer:  taxes, just like all other public schools.<br>
>> Rick is<br>
>> not disputing tha</blockquote></div>