<div class="gmail_quote"><span dir="ltr"></span><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;"><a style="" href="http://linuxmafia.com/mailman/listinfo/sf-lug" target="_blank"></a>Hi Shawn,<br>

I did find  some examples of wpa_supplicant configs in /usr/share/doc/wpasupplicant/examples. Your interfaces file might need some quotes around some items like the ssid, and fix the wpa-key-mgmt=WPA-PSK line (recall it was WPA-TKIP??).  Looks like<br>

you had the needed items in your interfaces file otherwise.  Don't know where  the name eth1 comes from, it used to be in an aliases file, but no more -- maybe wlan0 is the name of the wireless network and that's why the device was not found?  <br>
<br>Check out it which modules are loaded.  Things didn't seem to 
work with just the b43 and ssb.  Maybe the wl and b44 were necessary.  <br>lsmod |egrep "b4|ssb|wl"<br><br>dmesg |grep b43<br>to see what firmware (if any) got picked up.  Expect lines like:<br></blockquote><div>
[   17.245461] b43-phy0: Broadcom 4311 WLAN found (core revision 10)<br>[   17.287445] ip_tables: (C) 2000-2006 Netfilter Core Team<br>[   17.338958] ACPI: PCI Interrupt Link [LAZA] enabled at IRQ 17<br>[   17.338966]   alloc irq_desc for 17 on node -1<br>
[   17.338969]   alloc kstat_irqs on node -1<br>[   17.338982] HDA Intel 0000:00:10.1: PCI INT B -> Link[LAZA] -> GSI 17 (level, high) -> IRQ 17<br>[   17.339024] HDA Intel 0000:00:10.1: setting latency timer to 64<br>
[   17.353584] phy0: Selected rate control algorithm 'minstrel'<br>[   17.354491] Broadcom 43xx driver loaded [ Features: PL, Firmware-ID: FW13 ]<br>[   17.635118] type=1505 audit(1262624982.761:12): operation="profile_replace" pid=1018 name=/usr/share/gdm/guest-session/Xsession<br>
[   17.637261] type=1505 audit(1262624982.765:13): operation="profile_replace" pid=1019 name=/sbin/dhclient3<br>[   17.637628] type=1505 audit(1262624982.765:14): operation="profile_replace" pid=1019 name=/usr/lib/NetworkManager/nm-dhcp-client.action<br>
[   17.637839] type=1505 audit(1262624982.765:15): operation="profile_replace" pid=1019 name=/usr/lib/connman/scripts/dhclient-script<br>[   17.658124] type=1505 audit(1262624982.785:16): operation="profile_replace" pid=1020 name=/usr/bin/evince<br>
 </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
[   18.044164] b43 ssb0:0: firmware: requesting b43/ucode5.fw<br>[   18.064770] b43 ssb0:0: firmware: requesting b43-open/ucode5.fw<br>[   18.085430] b43 ssb0:0: firmware: requesting b43-open/pcm5.fw<br>[   18.094023] b43 ssb0:0: firmware: requesting b43-open/b0g0initvals5.fw<br>

<br>I'm not sure the firmware needs to be picked up if the wl driver is used.<br>If the b43 stuff is picked up, I assume it works.  If not, maybe hardwire<br>your system and install the b43-fwcutter (rename the /lib/firmware/b43 to<br>

something else first). Accept the offer to download the appropriate <br>Broadcom file.  the lspci command says my system is a 4312, but other places<br></blockquote><div>identify it as a 4311, so I guess the firmware could be different.  Another possibility is<br>
just to rename the /lib/firmware/b43 directory and see how the b43-open firmware works. <br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<br>ps auxwww |grep wpa<br>to see how the wpa_supplicant is being run.  My system is driving it off of the dbus interface, so wherever the config info is stored, it is being fed in that way.  The /etc/network/interfaces file is not used for the wireless config, my file only has the loopback.<br>
<br>I did find an old script named ifup-wireless which did the iwconfig commands on the wireless config items, but didn't see anything<br>
equivalent on my current Ubuntu system.  Hooking it up will involve editing other system ifup scripts -- that's why I dropped it as soon as the mechanisms supplied by the distirbutions handled the wireless for me. Check out what NetworkManager provides for static IPs, if you can use that mechanism, that will be far less painful.  As I recall, more and more things started happening automatically, so you were fighting internal mechanisms that would for instance submit wpa when the module was loaded.<br>
</blockquote><div> This script does the iwconfig setup, and submits the wpa_supplicant with appropriate args.<br>Good Luck<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
Ken<br><br>
<br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
sf-lug mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:sf-lug@linuxmafia.com" target="_blank">sf-lug@linuxmafia.com</a><br>
<a href="http://linuxmafia.com/mailman/listinfo/sf-lug" target="_blank">http://linuxmafia.com/mailman/listinfo/sf-lug</a><br>
Information about SF-LUG is at <a href="http://www.sf-lug.org/" target="_blank">http://www.sf-lug.org/</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br>