<html><head><style type="text/css"><!-- DIV {margin:0px;} --></style></head><body><div style="font-family:verdana,helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:12pt"><br>
<div style="font-family: verdana,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: 12pt;"><div style="font-family: times new roman,new york,times,serif; font-size: 12pt;"><div style="font-family: verdana,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: 12pt;"><div>Well, it is a Federal program, not SF politics. Do you know how many tests are in this program?<br></div><div style="font-family: verdana,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: 12pt;"><br><div style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; font-size: 13px;"><font face="Tahoma" size="2"><hr size="1"><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">From:</span></b> jim <jim@well.com><br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">To:</span></b> sf-lug <sf-lug@linuxmafia.com><br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Sent:</span></b> Sunday, September 6, 2009 10:23:08 AM<br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Subject:</span></b> [sf-lug] S. F. politics and software policies<br></font><br>
<br>           is there something about San Francisco politics that's <br>        not quite fair or open? the snippet below discusses new <br>        traffic management technology available only to windows-based <br>        cell phones. note the S.F. schools and some other public <br>        institutions seem windows-bound, not only internally, but <br>        wrt public access. of course, it might be that the other <br>        institutions involved have done the filtering, per below: <br>        <br>        from<br><span><span>        <a target="_blank" href="http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-cover6-2009sep06,0,6494829.story?page=2&track=rss">http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-cover6-2009sep06,0,6494829.story?page=2&track=rss</a>
 </span></span><br>        <br>        [A] major effort is dubbed IntelliDrive. Funded by the federal<br>        government and major automobile manufacturers, and overseen by <br>        the U.S. Department of Transportation, the program will begin <br>        tests of a traffic warning system in San Francisco next month.<br>        <br>        Participating drivers will receive signals on their cellphones <br>        alerting them to bottlenecks approximately 60 seconds ahead. <br>        The phone will say, "Slow traffic ahead" through its speaker <br>        phone or headset, and a message will appear on its screen.<br>        <br>        The operators of the program will use traffic information from <br> 
  
     several existing sources, including Caltrans, and crunch it to <br>        provide the real-time warnings. Only cellphones using... <br>        <br>                Windows-based operating <----  systems <br>        <br>        ...will be able to download the software to take part in the <br>        test--which leaves out iPhones and BlackBerrys, among others.<br>        <br>        A video showing how it works is at<br>        <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.intellidriveusa.org/library/videos.php">www.intellidriveusa.org/library/videos.php</a> <br>        The ultimate goal is a dashboard warning system, fed by sensors <br>        in cars and along highways, to alert drivers of
 potential
 <br>        hazards all around them, including blind spots.<br>        <br><br><br><br>_______________________________________________<br>sf-lug mailing list<br><a rel="nofollow" ymailto="mailto:sf-lug@linuxmafia.com" target="_blank" href="mailto:sf-lug@linuxmafia.com">sf-lug@linuxmafia.com</a><br><span><span><a target="_blank" href="http://linuxmafia.com/mailman/listinfo/sf-lug">http://linuxmafia.com/mailman/listinfo/sf-lug</a></span></span><br></div></div></div><meta http-equiv="x-dns-prefetch-control" content="on"></div></div></div></body></html>