<linux_humor> In fact, Bill's surname used to be Hendrick before he became a KDE desktop user </linux_humor><br><br>Larry Kafiero<br>Fedora 11 KDE user<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Jul 29, 2009 at 3:07 PM, Bill Kendrick <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:nbs@sonic.net">nbs@sonic.net</a>></span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;"><div class="im">On Wed, Jul 29, 2009 at 10:42:20AM -0700, Edward Janne wrote:<br>
> Question 4: What programs do you run on Linux?<br>
<br>
</div>On a regular basis:<br>
<br>
Konsole to do a lot of generic day-to-day stuff,<br>
including SSH'ing to my ISP's shell, so I can run Mutt to check my email,<br>
or SSH'ing various places to maintain websites and web applications<br>
(including my day job).<br>
<br>
Amarok to listen to music (local and streaming)<br>
<br>
Konqueror for most web browsing (random pages, daily stuff like bank account,<br>
etc.)<br>
<br>
Firefox for day-job, Facebook, SourceForge and Google (Maps/Calendar) browsing<br>
*grumbles about not being compatible with Konqueror*<br>
<br>
Konversation for chatting with local friends, as well as on a variety of<br>
OSS project channels on freenode<br>
<br>
Kate for some basic text editing and note taking (though sometimes also vi)<br>
<br>
Gimp for graphics editing/manipulation<br>
<br>
OpenOffice.org for document loading/creation<br>
<br>
Dolphin for some file management (esp. photos off my camera's SD card),<br>
though most file management is via shell<br>
<br>
vi for lots of editing, including code maintenance (day job and my own OSS)<br>
<br>
mplayer for watching local (vs. streamed via Flash) video files<br>
<div class="im"><br>
<br>
<br>
> Does software that starts out exclusively Linux often get ported to<br>
> other platforms? What is the motivation for this? Beyond being open<br>
> source, what functionality is unique to Linux?<br>
<br>
</div>"GNU/Linux," what I consider the 'operating system' (kernel plus<br>
lots of userspace tools and glue), is what makes Linux a lot easier to<br>
deal with than other platforms.  Environments like Cygwin on Windows can<br>
help, a _little_, but generally you cannot get past the fact that you're<br>
running on a cumbersome, buggy, and poorly designed OS and GUI.<br>
<br>
So sure, you can get a lot of OSS stuff for Windows and Mac, including<br>
a lot of KDE (my desktop environment of choice), but it's just not as<br>
smooth and enjoyable.[*]<br>
<br>
I've found very little reason to care about running non-Linux, especially<br>
since I stopped doing for BREW devices.  (That's just bad-on-bad, with<br>
a twist of horrid USB drivers, coupled with terrible device-specific<br>
implementation issues with BREW itself.  When I did J2ME, we at least had<br>
saner dev. tools, and I could do all dev. and 'emulator'-based testing<br>
under Linux.  It totally changed my attitude towards my job, at the time. :) )<br>
<br>
[*] Despite recent audio-related annoyances.<br>
<br>
-bill!<br>
(ramble? who, me?)<br>
<div><div></div><div class="h5"><br>
_______________________________________________<br>
sf-lug mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:sf-lug@linuxmafia.com">sf-lug@linuxmafia.com</a><br>
<a href="http://linuxmafia.com/mailman/listinfo/sf-lug" target="_blank">http://linuxmafia.com/mailman/listinfo/sf-lug</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br>