hi <br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Jun 15, 2008 at 10:43 PM, Andrew Fife <<a href="mailto:afife@untangle.com">afife@untangle.com</a>> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
I went over to visit Christian's F/OSS computer lab at the school this morning with Tom Belote.  I have to say its really inspiring to see what Christian has got going over there.</blockquote><div><br>Thanks a lot, Andrew!  <br>
<br>And folks, I have to say that it is really fun doing this work, too.  How long have we all been waiting for complete and total newbies to come to us with a request to help them use Linux?  For me, it is a nice change from when I was just first starting to use GNU-Linux, and I was talking with people everywhere about computers and trying to gradually steer the conversation around to Linux and the importance of freedom in cyberspace.  <br>
<br>In my experience, most people are bored by discussions of freedom in cyberspace, until they get their hands on a GNU-Linux computer and use it for a while.  It really takes people a while to get why it is cool.<br><br>
At the school, neither the kids nor the teachers really "get" why this stuff is important in a Stallmanesque kind of way.  It's not that they say, oh, it is so cool that we can create a community and improve the code and take control of our binary destiny!  Instead, they do appreciate the fact that the lab is the only room in the school where the teachers can bring an entire class and have each student get an Internet terminal to do their research or type up their papers. <br>
<br>AFAIK, no one by Jim Stockford and James Burgett have been over to the school to see the kids using the lab.  Anyone who would like to come over to the school to see the kids using the lab, please just let me know.  We will need to coordinate it with the teachers ahead of time, of course, but we could certainly do it.<br>
<br>Also, the kids are required to take Saturday school classes on an average of once every three weeks or so.  That is a great opportunity to show kids how to do stuff on Linux.  Next year, I am planning to have Saturday school classes in which the parents will come in with their kids to get training on how to use Linux.  So anyone who wants to join in on that project should please feel free to email me and let me know!  I am happy to coordinate those classes and other similar stuff here on the SF-LUG server or wiki, or we could do it on the Digital Tipping Point wiki, wherever this community would feel most at home. <br>
 </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">While Christian and I were blabbing about how to save the world, Tom got audio and video working across the network.  Its not perfect because the server can only support aprox 5 thin clients watching Youtube at the same time.  </blockquote>
<div><br>Right, but it was an important diagnostic breakthrough.  Now we know what _can_ be done, and why it was not working before, and what our options are. <br><br>And it's really true.  Tom is such a wizard, it was really a pleasure to see him work.  He just sat down there quietly while Andrew and I were blabbing like it was a beer hall, and boom, Tom got lots of work done.  I did learn a bit, though, as I always do from hanging out and looking over the shoulder of a guru like Tom. <br>
 </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">Tom also got software running that lets teachers see what each student is doing on their clients... can't remember what it was called though.</blockquote>
<div><br>I think it is called Client Network Manager.  It comes standard with Edubuntu, AFAIK. <br> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
For anyone that hasn't had the chance to make it over to the school, I'd definitely encourage you check it out.</blockquote><div><br>Thanks again for coming over to the school, Andrew!  Untangle.com (and ACCRC.org) has really been good to the Bay Area FOSS community.  In fact, we have given out a lot of the boxes that were configured during the March 1 installfest, and Robert Scott of Untangle.com was the guy who was basically leading up the school installfest site. <br>
<br>And Untangle and ACCRC are doing another massive installfest at LinuxWorld Expo in San Francisco this August, for those who don't know about it:  <br><br><a href="http://untangle.com/installfest">http://untangle.com/installfest</a><br>
</div></div><br>c u<br>