If ease of use and the 'it just works' (often attributed to Mac OS) philosophy appeals to you, I would recommend Ubuntu.  I have not use Mandriva proper...I tried out Mandrake a long time ago and didn't like it much, but Linux in general was not so refined (at the desktop level.)  Needless to say Linux has come a long way since then, particularly for desktop use, and I think most desktop leaning distributions like Ubuntu, Suse, Fedora, etc, are all pretty even in functionality and polish.  I prefer Ubuntu, but I will also say that Fedora and Suse are excellent distros.  I was rather impressed with PCBSD as a matter of fact (I saw it in action at LUGRADIO2008) and I even downloaded it and have been playing with it intermittently.  OpenSolaris still has a way to go, but it seemed to work fine on a desktop PC I was tinkering with at work.  The other reason I love Ubuntu so much is because of the large effort they have taken towards education (like Edubuntu.)  Education (and I mean true education not the business it has morphed into today) is the most important thing in the world to me, and I believe it will ultimately result in the righting of so much that is wrong in the world today.  Any company that takes such an active role in educating children (or anyone for that matter) and does it in a way that promotes freedom in every form is at the top of my list.<br>
<br>E<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, Apr 26, 2008 at 3:39 PM, Paul Ward <<a href="mailto:dssstrkl@gmail.com">dssstrkl@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
I've used one flavor of Linux or another since 1998, when I got<br>
introduced to Mandrake 2 or 3. Since it was light years better than my<br>
mac, I ditched it for a Linux box that later dual-booted win2k. I used<br>
that combo until 2002 when I got a PowerBook and have been using Macs<br>
full time since then. The old Linux box ran ubuntu until it died a<br>
couple of years ago. Since then, I've played with various distros in<br>
VMs, but I want to build a new machine, to use as a file/media server.<br>
I'm familiar with Unix CLI stuff, rolled my own Apache server, but<br>
have been out of the Linux game for a while.<br>
<div class="Ih2E3d"><br>
Paul Ward<br>
Sent from my iPhone<br>
<br>
</div><div><div></div><div class="Wj3C7c">On Apr 26, 2008, at 1:40 PM, Rick Moen <<a href="mailto:rick@linuxmafia.com">rick@linuxmafia.com</a>> wrote:<br>
<br>
> Quoting Paul Ward (<a href="mailto:dssstrkl@gmail.com">dssstrkl@gmail.com</a>):<br>
><br>
>> I'm sure this comes up every once in a while, and I'm definately not<br>
>> trying to start a distro war, but are there any significant<br>
>> differences between the current (k)ubuntu and Mandriva releases?<br>
><br>
> Yes.  There are some quite significant underlying differences.<br>
><br>
> If you don't mind the question, how much background do you already<br>
> have<br>
> on that subject, and on Linux generally?<br>
><br>
><br>
> _______________________________________________<br>
> sf-lug mailing list<br>
> <a href="mailto:sf-lug@linuxmafia.com">sf-lug@linuxmafia.com</a><br>
> <a href="http://linuxmafia.com/mailman/listinfo/sf-lug" target="_blank">http://linuxmafia.com/mailman/listinfo/sf-lug</a><br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
sf-lug mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:sf-lug@linuxmafia.com">sf-lug@linuxmafia.com</a><br>
<a href="http://linuxmafia.com/mailman/listinfo/sf-lug" target="_blank">http://linuxmafia.com/mailman/listinfo/sf-lug</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>Ernest de Leon<br><a href="http://www.smbtechadvice.com">http://www.smbtechadvice.com</a><br><br>"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - A common 18th Century sentiment voiced by Benjamin Franklin<br>
<br>"A patriot must always be ready to defend his country against his government." - Edward Abbey<br><br>"All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing." - Edmund Burke, English statesman and political philosopher (1729-1797)