why are you two always fighting?  :)<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Apr 8, 2008 at 12:48 PM, Rick Moen <<a href="mailto:rick@linuxmafia.com">rick@linuxmafia.com</a>> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div class="Ih2E3d">Quoting Christian Einfeldt (<a href="mailto:einfeldt@gmail.com">einfeldt@gmail.com</a>):<br>
<br>
</div><div class="Ih2E3d">> It is not a binary outcome of failure versus success.  There are<br>
> shades of performance.<br>
<br>
</div>I would call, in general, any significant software deployment without<br>
requirements analysis -- but in particular one where the customer is<br>
considering blowing everything away and installing Windows XP because of<br>
a deal-breaker requirement never identified for lack of doing<br>
requirements analysis -- to be functionally close to failure.  You<br>
evidently disagree.  Good luck with that.<br>
<br>
[snip a lot]<br>
<div class="Ih2E3d"><br>
> AFAIK, there is no WINE solution to the Adobe Premier Pro tools that the<br>
> school is sort of being forced to use.<br>
<br>
</div>What you said the _first_ time, to which Daniel responded, is:<br>
<div class="Ih2E3d"><br>
  If we don't get XP working in a virtual machine, we will need to blow<br>
  away Linux on these machines altogether, we will need to blow away<br>
  Linux altogether and install XP natively, because getting Adobe<br>
  Elements was the justification for acquiring these machines in the<br>
  first place.<br>
<br>
</div>Daniel's response, in part, was:<br>
<div class="Ih2E3d"><br>
  BTW, Elements is for photo editing, not video editing. I believe I<br>
  have heard reports of it being used under WINE.<br>
<br>
</div>So, now it's _not_ Adobe Elements, but rather Adobe Premier Pro?<br>
<br>
Just as an additional big, fat clue, it's helpful, when asking for help<br>
online, to give the full, correct names of things, e.g., "Adobe<br>
Premier Elements" or "Adobe Photoshop Elements" instead of just the<br>
unusably vague term "Adobe Elements".[1]  Extra bonus clue:  Software tends<br>
to have version numbers, which are often crucial data.  E.g., as a<br>
hypothetical example, Adobe Premier Pro 1.5 for Windows might be<br>
supportable on current versions of WINE but Adobe Premier Pro 2.0 for<br>
Windows might not.<br>
<br>
Now, perhaps you might be starting to understand why requirements<br>
analysis (the competent kind, where you are clear about, and keep<br>
accurate records of, what all the software titles are, and what versions<br>
they are) is so crucial.<br>
<br>
Or maybe not.<br>
<br>
[1]  Here's my guess:  What you've variously described as "Adobe<br>
Elements" and "Adobe Premiere Pro" without bothering to get the<br>
software's name right or provide version numbers is, really, Adobe<br>
Premiere Elements 3.x or 4.0 for Windows -- which is an entry-level,<br>
limited version of the Adobe Premier Pro for Windows video-editing<br>
package aimed at the home market.  The schools might or might not have<br>
also been given freebie copies of Adobe Protoshop Elements 6.0 for<br>
Windows, which is an  entry-level, limited version of the Adobe<br>
Protoshop for Windows raster-image editor package aimed at the home<br>
market.<br>
<div><div></div><div class="Wj3C7c"><br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
sf-lug mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:sf-lug@linuxmafia.com">sf-lug@linuxmafia.com</a><br>
<a href="http://linuxmafia.com/mailman/listinfo/sf-lug" target="_blank">http://linuxmafia.com/mailman/listinfo/sf-lug</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>Ernest de Leon<br><a href="http://www.smbtechadvice.com">http://www.smbtechadvice.com</a><br><br>"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - A common 18th Century sentiment voiced by Benjamin Franklin<br>
<br>"A patriot must always be ready to defend his country against his government." - Edward Abbey<br><br>"All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing." - Edmund Burke, English statesman and political philosopher (1729-1797)