hi <br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Mar 10, 2008 at 11:30 PM, Rick Moen <<a href="mailto:rick@linuxmafia.com">rick@linuxmafia.com</a>> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div class="Ih2E3d">Quoting Christian Einfeldt (<a href="mailto:einfeldt@gmail.com">einfeldt@gmail.com</a>):<br>
<br>
> I am already getting more requests for FOSS boxes from the March 1<br>
> installfest than I can handle, and I would love to get some help<br>
> getting these boxes out to people.<br>
<br>
</div>As an aside, Christian, I think it's more than odd for you to<br>
continually refer to these as free / open source software boxes, when<br>
they include significant amounts of proprietary software -- and when in<br>
fact you're a vocal proponent of including proprietary code.<br>
<br>
I suspect my own machines are a great deal more close to 100%<br>
unqualifiedly open source than any boxes you build or advocate </blockquote><div><br>So if your boxes are not 100%, what percent of "purity" have you achieved?  And, hypothetically speaking, if your boxes are, say, 2% more "pure" than the boxes that those involved with our SF giveaways are donating, how do we measure the significance of that difference?<br>
<br>Please do recall that Richard Stallman has said repeatedly that he has used Unix to create the tools to move away from non-Free software.  I see my efforts in a similar vein.  Of course I would prefer to give out nothing but gNewSense.  But that is not feasible for me right now.  If you would like to help us achieve a greater level of purity, we will be having a get-together this Saturday at 1430 Scott at Geary.  We do have a rather large number of machines to work on, and there is nothing that would prevent you from installing the distro of your choice on those boxes.  I have no desire to be the "lead" or the single point of failure for this school project.  I welcome anyone else to make whatever contributions they would like, and if they can get momentum behind this effort, I am perfectly willing to be a gopher, because nearly everything that I am doing with this work is over my skill level. <br>
<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">Anyhow, my current point is not to object to your fixation on including<br>
proprietary software, but rather to point out that your calling the result<br>
"FOSS boxes" is inappropriate, as they plainly are not that.</blockquote><div><br>What label do you use for boxes that you give out?  Maybe I could adopt that terminology for the boxes that I give out.  I mainly prefer FOSS or Free Open Source Software because it is close enough.  For example, I don't give out Linspire boxes.  But even those boxes are FOSS boxes IMHO.  Again, if RMS worked on Unix to get us here, then maybe we need to put up with some non-Free blobs in the short term to get mostly Free Software boxes in front of people and actually using the major Free Software components.  <br>
<br>IMHO, the most important concept is that the Debian pool / RPM pool is going to replace much of the functionality of third party apps in the Microsoft Windows world.  If we can get the average simple end user to understand that there is lots of Free Software that is good enough, then maybe we can break the logic underlying the cohesiveness of the Microsoft business network.  Rome wasn't built in a day, and it will take a while to get a majority of end users deploying something like gNewSense.  That ultimately is my personal goal.  But getting there is tough.  It requires step-by-step work.  <br>
<br>For example, when I speak with the teachers at the school about Free Software, their eyes just glaze over.  They don't care about Richard's four freedoms.  But they do use the lab, and I do have footage of Richard Stallman from one year in the lab saying that he thought our lab was a good thing, because we do attempt to educate the kids about his four freedoms.  I understand that you might disagree with Richard, but I agree with him on this point. <br>
 </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">(I notice that Canonical has recently begun referring to proprietary<br>
software as "commercial software", and not coincidentally has started to<br>
sell it directly in a big way:<br>
<a href="http://brutalblog.wordpress.com/2008/02/08/canonical-will-sell-proprietary-software-to-ubuntu-users/" target="_blank">http://brutalblog.wordpress.com/2008/02/08/canonical-will-sell-proprietary-software-to-ubuntu-users/</a><br>

<div><div></div><div class="Wj3C7c">)<br>
</div></div></blockquote><div><br></div></div>Well, you will soon have a chance to confront Mark Shuttleworth with those points.  Do you think that you will bring it up with him? <br>