<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Mar 4, 2008 at 3:28 PM, jim stockford <<a href="mailto:jim@well.com">jim@well.com</a>> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
   upon further thinking, it seems to me we cannot<br>
expect people whom we help to give back: the law<br>
of numbers dictates that most people will just do<br>
their thing their way, </blockquote><div><br>
True.  and it is exactly those kinds of people who should, IMHO, be the last in line to get computers.  I am not saying that they should be left out in the cold; I'm just saying let's find the prime quality recipients first.  <br>
 
<br> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">   to develop someone who knows and cares, one<br>
must put in some time with that person, keep in<br>
touch, be a mentor, and groom that person to take<br>
up the flag to help others. it's a slow process, but<br>
exponential in growth, like compound interest:</blockquote><div><br>Right.  I personally would rather deal with these people. <br> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
   seems to me the answer is clear: how to get<br>
computers? apply to ACCRC.</blockquote><div><br>Yeah, and James does get lots and lots of applications all the time.  I filled out that application for the school.  So bear in mind that there are large numbers of people filling out those applications and sending them in.</div>
</div><br>