<div>Damn, I work in a Microsoft shop and billg doesn't even take me for golf, let alone bribe me while we're there.</div>
<div> </div>
<div>What did I miss? </div>
<div> </div>
<div>:)<br><br> </div>
<div><span class="gmail_quote">On 1/25/08, <b class="gmail_sendername">jim stockford</b> <<a href="mailto:jim@well.com">jim@well.com</a>> wrote:</span>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="PADDING-LEFT: 1ex; MARGIN: 0px 0px 0px 0.8ex; BORDER-LEFT: #ccc 1px solid"><br>   IBM was famous for making its deals on golf<br>courses: "nobody ever gets fired for buying<br>
IBM", which meant the guy who bought<br>honeywell or perkin-elmer was gonna get<br>talked about if the systems screwed up even<br>a little ("talked about" == "likely fired").<br>   MSFT's tactics seem similar, at least if court<br>
cases in USA and EU are an indication.<br>   seems similar backroom/golf course tactics<br>going on with the target markets for OLPC.<br>i.e. seems like deal making and even outright<br>bribery are at work. the big difference is that<br>
these days there's a well-organized open<br>source community, thanks to internet<br>communications. ergo, defending this medium<br>and using it seems key.<br><br><br><br>On Jan 25, 2008, at 12:55 PM, RBV wrote:<br><br>
> Hi:<br>><br>> If I can be allowed to make a small side observation about the OLPC's<br>> apparent, and apparently non-trivial, delivery problems.<br>><br>> At the last OLPC meeting, I was *hugely* impressed with the design and<br>
> operation of the OLPCs that Jim brought in for us to examine.  The<br>> OLPC is not only an exemplar of brilliant design, it's a testament to<br>> the ability of non-proprietary technologies to fulfill such designs.<br>
><br>> But those with a historical perspective on technology can remember<br>> many instances in which superior technology was trumped by superior<br>> pre- and post-sales customer support.<br>><br>> For example, IBM became a mainframe giant not because its systems were<br>
> the most technically compelling (the company generally preferred to<br>> sidestep or befog A-versus-B performance comparisons), but because the<br>> company offered customer service and support that was far superior to<br>
> its competitors', albeit in sometimes heavy-handed ways.<br>><br>> Intel learned from IBM, and so commandeered market share from more<br>> elegantly designed chip products by offering superlative design and<br>
> manufacturing support.<br>><br>> Like many, I'd be genuinely unhappy to see malicious proprietary<br>> vendors -- including, not incidentally, Intel -- undermine the OLPC<br>> idea.  But I'd also say that the critical challenge for OLPC is not<br>
> one of technologies but rather support.  Given that OLPC seems to be<br>> antagonizing those who've voted with their pocketbook for the system<br>> and its goals, one can but wonder if anyone at OLPC is prepared to<br>
> understand and react the importance of that support challenge...<br>><br>> Sorry if this submission seems a bit to the side of the central issue,<br>> but I believe it to be of some relevance.  Open source -- especially<br>
> Linux -- is a lovely thing, but too often considers user and customer<br>> needs to be annoying distractions from the "interesting" technological<br>> bits...<br>><br>> Cheers,<br>> Riley<br>
> SFO<br>><br>> _______________________________________________<br>> sf-lug mailing list<br>> <a href="mailto:sf-lug@linuxmafia.com">sf-lug@linuxmafia.com</a><br>> <a href="http://linuxmafia.com/mailman/listinfo/sf-lug">http://linuxmafia.com/mailman/listinfo/sf-lug</a><br>
><br><br><br>_______________________________________________<br>sf-lug mailing list<br><a href="mailto:sf-lug@linuxmafia.com">sf-lug@linuxmafia.com</a><br><a href="http://linuxmafia.com/mailman/listinfo/sf-lug">http://linuxmafia.com/mailman/listinfo/sf-lug</a><br>
</blockquote></div><br>