<div> </div>
<div><GEEK_ALERT> the following contains commands, </div>
<div>including making a cron job that could stand a reality check.</div>
<div>-----------------------------------------------------</div>
<div> </div>
<div>I've been working on this date and time stuff a bit: </div>
<div> </div>
<div>tzdata-2006m-3.el4.noarch.rpm for RHEL systems contains </div>
<div>updated data to account for the new USA daylight savings time. </div>
<div>   You can get it from </div>
<div><a href="http://rpm.pbone.net/index.php3/stat/4/idpl/3649130/com/tzdata-2006m-3.el4.noarch.rpm.html">http://rpm.pbone.net/index.php3/stat/4/idpl/3649130/com/tzdata-2006m-3.el4.noarch.rpm.html</a> </div>
<div>   I don't know what's the equivalent for debian-based systems. </div>
<div>without it your systems will not adjust for this Sunday's </div>
<div>daylight savings change--they'll do last year's thing. Note </div>
<div>the root prompt, and note the command assumes you've </div>
<div>downloaded the file in the current directory. </div>
<div># rpm -Uvh ./tzdata-2006m-3.el4.noarch.rpm </div>
<div># rpm -qa | grep tzdata  # do this if you want to verify tzdata is installed </div>
<div> </div>
<div>   RHEL systems come with the rdate command in the /usr/bin/ </div>
<div>directory. This'll update your system time if you use the syntax </div>
<div># rdate -s <timeserver> </div>
<div>for example, </div>
<div># rdate -s <a href="http://time-a.nist.gov">time-a.nist.gov</a> <br>   (note the root prompt.) (there are timeservers other than <a href="http://time-a.nist.gov">time-a.nist.gov</a>) </div>
<div>   put this in a cron job to automate regular time synching--</div>
<div>note after crontab comes up you have to use the  G  command to jump </div>
<div>to the bottom of the file then the  i  command to insert text. </div>
<div># crontab -e  # brings up a vi editor ready to edit the system crontab file </div>
<div>i</div>
<div>* 1 * * * /usr/bin/rdate -s <timeserver> </div>
<div><ESC> :wq</div>
<div>
<div>(hit the escape key to put vi in command mode then type </div>
<div>the colon ( : ) character followed by w and q to write and quit.)</div>
<div>   At 1 AM your system will update the system clock. </div>
<div> </div></div>
<div>   There are two clocks, the system clock in RAM and a hardware </div>
<div>clock that is maintained (on commodity Intel boxes) by BIOS in </div>
<div>CMOS memory. Whenever you shutdown normally part of the </div>
<div>shutdown process syncs the hardware clock to the system clock. </div>
<div>Whenever you boot up, the boot process reads the hardware clock </div>
<div>into the system clock. </div>
<div>   There is such a thing as "drift", meaning that the electronics and </div>
<div>data do not do a perfect job of keeping time: over many hours the </div>
<div>system and hardware clocks vary from exact time maintained by </div>
<div>the atomic clocks for the world (accessible via <a href="http://time-a.nist.gov">time-a.nist.gov</a>). </div>
<div>Note that the system and hardware clocks drift independently. </div>
<div>   If you rip the power cord, there's no normal shutdown and no </div>
<div>syncing the hardware clock to the system clock. The subsequent </div>
<div>boot process reads whatever value of the hardware clock into the </div>
<div>system clock. </div>
<div>   You can control syncing the hardware clock to the system clock </div>
<div>with the command </div>
<div># /sbin/hwclock --systohc </div>
<div>   I think--my cron skills are weak--the following will work </div>
<div>
<div>note after crontab comes up you have to use the  G  command to jump </div>
<div>to the bottom of the file then the  i  command to insert text. </div></div>
<div># crontab -e </div>
<div>G i </div>
<div>
<div>5 1 * * * /sbin/hwclock --systohc  </div>
<div>
<div><ESC> :wq </div>
<div>(hit the escape key to put vi in command mode then type </div>
<div>the colon ( : ) character followed by w and q to write and quit.)</div></div></div>
<div>   At five minutes after 1 AM your system will sync the </div>
<div>hardware clock to the system clock. If the box does lose </div>
<div>power, after it comes back up, it'll use hardware clock time </div>
<div>that won't be very far off, and the system will be back on </div>
<div>realtime after 1 AM. <br> </div>
<div> </div>
<div><span class="gmail_quote">On 3/7/07, <b class="gmail_sendername">Rick Moen</b> <<a href="mailto:rick@linuxmafia.com">rick@linuxmafia.com</a>> wrote:</span>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="PADDING-LEFT: 1ex; MARGIN: 0px 0px 0px 0.8ex; BORDER-LEFT: #ccc 1px solid">Quoting Jason Turner (<a href="mailto:jturner@nonzerosums.org">jturner@nonzerosums.org</a>):<br><br>> <a href="http://www.linux-watch.com/news/NS6300294422.html">
http://www.linux-watch.com/news/NS6300294422.html</a><br>><br>> Not a must read, but it casts a bit of light on how Linux systems<br>> keep time(and provides a method for confirming/updating your system<br>> config).
<br><br>If you were a _Linux Gazette_ reader, you would have seen this on March<br>1st:<br><br><a href="http://linuxgazette.net/136/lg_tips.html">http://linuxgazette.net/136/lg_tips.html</a><br><br>--<br>Cheers,             We write precisely            We say exactly
<br>Rick Moen           Since such is our habit in    How to do a thing or how<br><a href="mailto:rick@linuxmafia.com">rick@linuxmafia.com</a> Talking to machines;          Every detail works.<br>Excerpt from Prof. Touretzky's 
decss-haiku.txt @ <a href="http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~dst/">http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~dst/</a><br><br>_______________________________________________<br>sf-lug mailing list<br><a href="mailto:sf-lug@linuxmafia.com">sf-lug@linuxmafia.com
</a><br><a href="http://linuxmafia.com/mailman/listinfo/sf-lug">http://linuxmafia.com/mailman/listinfo/sf-lug</a><br></blockquote></div><br>