The private was a pure accident. I pressed "reply" instead of "reply all" by mistake. My apologies.<br><br><div><span class="gmail_quote">On 3/3/07, <b class="gmail_sendername">Rick Moen</b> <<a href="mailto:rick@linuxmafia.com">
rick@linuxmafia.com</a>> wrote:</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">A list-member wrote me offlist to ask me what laptop I would recommend
<br>for Linux use, that ordinary humans can afford, doesn't weigh too much,<br>and has reasonable battery life.<br><br>(No offence taken, but discussion threads should remain on-list unless<br>you have some reason for privacy.  If you have the latter, please begin
<br>by explaining _why_ you've gone offlist into private discussion.  Most<br>of us participate in these public forums to benefit the community.  If<br>you want private help, it's called "consulting":  You should offer to
<br>pay hourly consulting rates, and not expect professional work from<br>strangers for free.)<br><br>I'm not going to give a "buy this" endorsement, but I can help teach how<br>to select hardware (and how not to).  My guiding star in this area is
<br>what I call Moen's Law of Hardware:  "Use what the programmers use."<br><a href="http://linuxmafia.com/~rick/lexicon.html#moenslaw-hardware">http://linuxmafia.com/~rick/lexicon.html#moenslaw-hardware</a>
  (Cited URL<br>elaborates on that point.)<br><br>You are unlikely to _literally_ know what Alan Cox, Dave Jones, Jeff<br>Garzik, et alii are using today -- but you can learn enough about<br>hardware to learn what they probably _would_ consider junk to be
<br>avoided (and why), and that is what one should do, generally speaking.<br><br>For reasons cited at that essay, slightly _older_ gear (especially where<br>laptops are concerned) is likely to be less problematic than new gear.
<br>I'd generally aim for a 1-2 year old model.  (To be more clear about<br>that, buying a spanking-new laptop model means you're either a Linux<br>hardware expert, or a masochist, or feeling really lucky.  Smart, lazy
<br>people buy used.)<br><br>You can also benefit from other people's write-ups, based on their<br>experience:<br><br><a href="http://www.linux-laptop.net/">http://www.linux-laptop.net/</a><br><a href="http://tuxmobil.org/">
http://tuxmobil.org/</a><br><br>It's useful to bring a notepad, pen, and Knoppix disc with you, as you<br>look at laptops.  Boot Knoppix, and jot down significant chipset<br>identities.  What's a chipset?  Let me illustrate using the server that
<br>SF-LUG's mailing list runs on.  (Only selected return values are shown<br>for commands below.)<br><br># dmesg | more<br><br>CPU: Intel Pentium III (Katmai) stepping 02<br><br>   OK, it's a single-proc PIII.<br>
<br>..... CPU clock speed is 498.7724 MHz.<br><br>   Running at 500 Mhz.<br><br>Serial driver version 5.05c (2001-07-08) with HUB-6 MANY_PORTS MULTIPORT SHARE_I<br>RQ SERIAL_PCI enabled<br>ttyS00 at 0x03f8 (irq = 4) is a 16550A
<br>ttyS01 at 0x02f8 (irq = 3) is a 16550A<br><br>  Two serial ports.<br><br>SCSI subsystem driver Revision: 1.00<br>sym.0.13.0: setting PCI_COMMAND_PARITY...<br>sym.0.13.1: setting PCI_COMMAND_PARITY...<br>sym0: <875> rev 0x37 on pci bus 0 device 13 function 0 irq 10
<br>sym0: No NVRAM, ID 7, Fast-20, SE, parity checking<br>sym0: SCSI BUS has been reset.<br>sym1: <875> rev 0x37 on pci bus 0 device 13 function 1 irq 5<br>sym1: No NVRAM, ID 7, Fast-20, SE, parity checking<br>sym1: SCSI BUS has been reset.
<br>scsi0 : sym-2.1.17a<br>scsi1 : sym-2.1.17a<br><br>  Symbios model 875 SCSI chip (later revealed to have full model<br>designation 53c875).<br><br>blk: queue cfe38174, I/O limit 4095Mb (mask 0xffffffff)<br>  Vendor: QUANTUM   Model: QM39100TD-SW      Rev: N491
<br>  Type:   Direct-Access                      ANSI SCSI revision: 02<br>blk: queue cfe38274, I/O limit 4095Mb (mask 0xffffffff)<br>  Vendor: QUANTUM   Model: QM39100TD-SW      Rev: N491<br>  Type:   Direct-Access                      ANSI SCSI revision: 02
<br>blk: queue cfe38374, I/O limit 4095Mb (mask 0xffffffff)<br>sym0:3:0: tagged command queuing enabled, command queue depth 16.<br>sym0:4:0: tagged command queuing enabled, command queue depth 16.<br>Attached scsi disk sda at scsi0, channel 0, id 3, lun 0
<br>Attached scsi disk sdb at scsi0, channel 0, id 4, lun 0<br>sym0:3: FAST-20 WIDE SCSI 40.0 MB/s ST (50.0 ns, offset 16)<br>SCSI device sda: 17783250 512-byte hdwr sectors (9105 MB)<br>Partition check:<br> /dev/scsi/host0/bus0/target3/lun0: p1 p2 < p5 p6 p7 p8 p9 >
<br>sym0:4: FAST-20 WIDE SCSI 40.0 MB/s ST (50.0 ns, offset 16)<br>SCSI device sdb: 17783250 512-byte hdwr sectors (9105 MB)<br> /dev/scsi/host0/bus0/target4/lun0: p1 p2 < p5 p6 p7 p8 ><br><br>  Two Quantum model QM39100TD-SW SCSI hard drives.  And, oooh!  They're
<br>  each a full 9 GB -- the very pinnacle of 1997 technology.<br><br>usb.c: registered new driver usbdevfs<br>usb.c: registered new driver hub<br>uhci.c: USB Universal Host Controller Interface driver v1.1<br>uhci.c: USB UHCI at I/O 0x10c0, IRQ 5
<br>usb.c: new USB bus registered, assigned bus number 1<br>hub.c: USB hub found<br>hub.c: 2 ports detected<br><br>  Two UHCI-type USB ports.<br><br>Intel(R) PRO/100 Network Driver - version 2.3.43-k1<br>Copyright (c) 2004 Intel Corporation
<br>e100: selftest OK.<br>e100: eth0: Intel(R) PRO/100 Network Connection<br>e100: selftest OK.<br>e100: eth1: Intel(R) PRO/100 Network Connection<br>  Hardware receive checksums enabled<br>  cpu cycle saver enabled<br><br>
  A pair of Intel e100-compatible PRO/100 ethernet ports.<br><br># lspci | more<br>0000:00:00.0 Host bridge: Intel Corporation 440BX/ZX/DX - 82443BX/ZX/DX Host bridge (AGP disabled) (rev 03)<br>0000:00:0d.0 SCSI storage controller: LSI Logic / Symbios Logic 53c875 (rev 37)
<br>0000:00:0d.1 SCSI storage controller: LSI Logic / Symbios Logic 53c875 (rev 37)<br>0000:00:0f.0 Ethernet controller: Intel Corporation 82557/8/9 [Ethernet Pro 100]<br> (rev 05)<br>0000:00:10.0 Ethernet controller: Intel Corporation 82557/8/9 [Ethernet Pro 100]
<br> (rev 08)<br>0000:00:12.0 ISA bridge: Intel Corporation 82371AB/EB/MB PIIX4 ISA (rev 02)<br>0000:00:12.1 IDE interface: Intel Corporation 82371AB/EB/MB PIIX4 IDE (rev 01)<br>0000:00:12.2 USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82371AB/EB/MB PIIX4 USB (rev 01)
<br>0000:00:12.3 Bridge: Intel Corporation 82371AB/EB/MB PIIX4 ACPI (rev 02)<br>0000:00:14.0 VGA compatible controller: Cirrus Logic GD 5480 (rev 23)<br><br>   This confirms what we knew before, and gives more detail:  It's an
<br>Intel 440BX motherboard (dating from 1998[1]).  We also find out that<br>the integrated video is Cirrus Logic GD 5480.<br><br>The 82371AB chip is what's termed a "southbridge" chip, the motherboard<br>chip serving most of[2] the I/O ports.  The 82443BX "northbridge" chip is where
<br>the CPU and system RAM attach.  (Together, they comprise the bulk of the<br>440 BX motherboard design.[3])<br><br>If this had been, say, a laptop you were interested in buying, as<br>opposed to just an old server, you would now be armed with the
<br>identities of the constituent chips, and could ask around (or read on<br>the sites mentioned) about likely problem areas.<br><br>Also, Knoppix's hardware auto-probing is advanced enough that it can<br>tell you a tremendous amount just from seeing what it does and does not
<br>support properly, upon bootup.<br><br><br>[1] <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_440BX">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_440BX</a><br>[2] In later Intel designs, _all_ of the I/O ports moved to the<br>southbridge.  In 1998, the northbridge still connected to video,
<br>network, and other very high-speed devices.<br>[3] <a href="http://arstechnica.com/articles/paedia/hardware/mobo-guide-1.ars/3">http://arstechnica.com/articles/paedia/hardware/mobo-guide-1.ars/3</a><br><br>_______________________________________________
<br>sf-lug mailing list<br><a href="mailto:sf-lug@linuxmafia.com">sf-lug@linuxmafia.com</a><br><a href="http://linuxmafia.com/mailman/listinfo/sf-lug">http://linuxmafia.com/mailman/listinfo/sf-lug</a><br></blockquote></div>
<br>