<b><i>Rick Moen <rick@linuxmafia.com></i></b> wrote:<blockquote class="replbq" style="border-left: 2px solid rgb(16, 16, 255); margin-left: 5px; padding-left: 5px;"> Quoting Asheesh Laroia (asheesh@asheesh.org):<br><br>> Sounds to me like you're reacting a little strongly, Adrien.  I won't <br>> claim to truly know what they want this person for, but the position <br>> sounded reasonable.<br><br>If I had to place a bet, I'd go with Adrian's assessment.  He's gone<br>around the block a few times with the developer consulting business, and <br>has an amazing collection of stories from the trenches.  He's pretty<br>good at spotting situations that have problems.<br><br></blockquote><br>I don't want to say this particular situation is a problem, I like to take things at face value. However, whenever interviewing for this type of job, you should ask questions like:<br><br>     - Why is this position open? Did someone leave the company? If so,
 why did that person leave? Can I contact that person and ask his/her opinion of the work place?<br><br>     - Are you currently on a tight deadline? If so, why did the person who was working on the project decide to leave at such a critical time?<br><br>     - How many people are currently members of the technical staff? (Make sure you meet with at least one of them).<br><br>     - If you accept the job, get everything in writing, including a detailed listing of job responsibilities, salary, any promised bonuses, vacation time, etc. Any legitimate company will have an employee handbook that outlines most of these things (except for your particular job tasks, which will be created specifically for your position.)<br><br>In short, perform your due-diligence when investigating a job opportunity.<br><br>Cheers.<br><br><p>
                <hr size=1>Yahoo! Music Unlimited - Access over 1 million songs.
<a href="http://pa.yahoo.com/*http://us.rd.yahoo.com/evt=36035/*http://music.yahoo.com/unlimited/ 
">Try it free.</a>