<br><br><div><span class="gmail_quote">On 5/16/06, <b class="gmail_sendername">Adrien Lamothe</b> <<a href="mailto:alamozzz@yahoo.com">alamozzz@yahoo.com</a>> wrote:</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div>Computers, and their attendant operating systems, are very complicated pieces of technology. Unfortunately, there is usually no way to perform a complicated operation without first understanding the complexity and then understanding the operational techniques to affect the desired change(s). The best we can hope for is to use a computer that is pre-configured in a manner that supports our normal usage, then either learn how or hire someone to perform whatever changes/maintenance is needed.
</div></blockquote><div><br>I agree that computing systems are complicated, but we should think about why they are complicated and whether they must be.  And I think your "best hope" is too pessimistic. <br></div>
<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;"><div><span class="e" id="q_10b3e570dd4cf101_1">The wonderful thing about computers is that they are programmable and therefore flexible.  They can replace a pocket calculator, or, if you prefer, they can replace a slide rule.  Or a library card catalog or a typewriter.  Programmability is an endless wonder.  I think, also, that it is the source of the complexity that is the bane of the third millennium.  But the complexity is not inherent, it is under our control.  A small measure of complexity is the inevitable consequence of programmability, but that much we all could live with.  The sad fact is that most computer operating systems and applications are burdened with gratuitous complexity that could have been avoided if they had been better-designed.
<br></span></div><div><span class="e" id="q_10b3e570dd4cf101_3"><br>with hope,</span></div></blockquote><div><br><br>Greg Nelson <span class="e" id="q_10b3e570dd4cf101_3"><br><a href="mailto:greg@perlnelson.org" target="_blank" onclick="return top.js.OpenExtLink(window,event,this)">
greg@perlnelson.org</a><br>839
 Richardson Ct Palo Alto, CA USA 94303<br></span>(650) 856 8103 (home) (650) 856 8103 (office) (650) 954 5338 (mobile)  _______________________________________________</div><br></div>