<b><i>Rick Moen <rick@linuxmafia.com></i></b> wrote:<blockquote class="replbq" style="border-left: 2px solid rgb(16, 16, 255); margin-left: 5px; padding-left: 5px;">The schools and social-welfare bureaucracies have a long history of<br>giving the polite brush-off to unfamiliar outsiders wanting to "help" them.<br>They have good reason, from their perspective, for this posture, and<br>volunteers wishing to get involved will find it very slow going.  If<br>they listen carefully, they'll hear a lot of polite skepticism, and the<br>unspoken but obvious assumption that you're asking them to buy into<br>something exotic that will be unmaintainable without expensive ongoing<br>technical assistance for which there is simply no budget.<br><tm><br></tm></blockquote>Definitely. I spent some time working for the largest and oldest educational media company. Part of my job involved helping set up meetings with various State Superintendants of Education and on one occasion a State Governor
 who wanted to wire the secondary schools in his state. The process is VERY political; I remember one consultant describing how he could help us navigate the "byzantine procurement process" of a particular school system. My guess is that someone near the top of the heirarchy, maybe even the Mayor himself, will want to make the announcement, and take the credit for, adopting a change to any new technology.<br><br>Just remember, the revolution will not be televised.<br><br>Cheers,<br><br>Adrien<br><br><br><br><br><p>
                <hr size=1>Yahoo! Mail<br>
Bring photos to life! <a href="http://pa.yahoo.com/*http://us.rd.yahoo.com/evt=39174/*http://photomail.mail.yahoo.com">New PhotoMail </a> makes sharing a breeze.