<div id="RTEContent">Happy New Year!<br><br>I'm very optimistic about 2006; I think this will be a banner year for open-source software (with most of the good stuff happening later in the year.)<br><br>Thanks, Rick, for explaining uncle-enzo and the network setup and the reference to Raw Bandwidth Communications.<br><br>Have you ever monitored RAM usage on uncle-enzo? RAM is really inexpensive these days, even the older PC-100 (you can also usually use PC-133 safely in a PC-100 system.) UPSes have also come way down in price.<br><br>I would ask what kernel uncle-enzo is running, but that is probably an improper question due to security concerns.<br><br>Cheers,<br><br>Adrien<br><br><br><b><i>Rick Moen <rick@linuxmafia.com></i></b> wrote:<blockquote class="replbq" style="border-left: 2px solid rgb(16, 16, 255); margin-left: 5px; padding-left: 5px;"> Quoting jim stockford (jim@well.com):<br><br>>(this message also tests that the sf-lug mailing list<br>>is working on the
 linuxmafia.com host.)<br><br>You might have noticed that the machine had ten hours of downtime <br>(5 am to 3 pm), courtesy of the longest storm-induced power outage my<br>household has seen in about five years.  More below.<br><br>First, just a few words about the current situation, since we-all simply<br>popped up on linuxmafia.com like mushrooms in the spring.  Jim and a<br>friend are still busy working on restoring the _real_ SF-LUG mailing<br>list and Web site, and I believe are considering hosting options.<br>Meanwhile, I offered to give the mailing list a temporary home on my<br>Mailman-equipped Linux server, linuxmafia.com.  (Yr. welcome.  Glad to<br>help.) <br><br>linuxmafia.com (aka "uncle-enzo.linuxmafia.com", for you Neal Stephenson<br>fans) is the antique 1998-era VA Research model 500 2U server[1] in my<br>living room in suburban West Menlo Park just north of Stanford U.,<br>connected through home aDSL service provided by Raw Bandwidth<br>Communications (which company
 I recommend strongly).  I am _not_ the<br>listadmin of this temporary mailing list incarnation; Jim is.  I'm just<br>the current hardware's bit janitor (sysadmin) and pink-slip owner.  ;->  <br><br>As SF-LUG has already learned somewhat painfully, keeping a group's<br>Internet presence on a machine in someone's residence has its<br>disadvantages.  Even for the resident, it's a tradeoff:<br><br>On the plus side:  Bandwidth uptime is exceptional, thanks to Mike<br>Durkin at Raw Bandwidth, who is fanatical about such things.  Also, <br>I get complete control of all aspects of my machine including physical <br>custody.  And it's pretty cheap for what I get, considering all the<br>other needs simultaneously served by the incoming pipe and 5 routable<br>IPs.  (If you want business details, consult http://www.rawbandwidth.com/ <br>and talk to Mike.  Not me, please.  I'm just a customer.)<br><br>On the minus side:  Effective throughput is merely adequate compared to <br>what's available
 at your average colo -- enough that I've survived a<br>couple of slashdottings, but with some strain.  (I'm spoiled, having<br>gotten used to the T-1 in my old building in S.F.)  Also, power outages<br>and other physical-plant issues are _my_ problem.<br><br>My long-term solution to the power-outage problem is mostly to punt:  <br>I've never bothered putting uncle-enzo on a UPS.  The software's<br>completely bulletproof and the hardware's disposable.  Power outages<br>knock it offline for maybe half an hour a couple of times a year:  When<br>the power comes back, all service reliably come back.  If I get unlucky<br>and a surge burns out a PSU or hard drive, I can bring the machine back<br>in about an hour on substitute hardware that's ready for that<br>purpose.[3]<br><br>Back in 2001, you may recall that our {cough} friends at Enron and kin<br>visited upon us an entire summer of rolling blackouts.  _That_ created<br>some challenges for uncle-enzo, because all of the
 journaling<br>filesystems were still pretty beta, and I was at the time still 100%<br>ext2.  Because of the power crisis, I did an urgent rebuild onto SGI's<br>XFS filesystem in May 2001[2], thereby fixing the immediate problem.<br>The next full site rebuild after that, in 2003, I switched to ext3 --<br>except still using ext2 for /usr (normally mounted read-only) and for<br>/tmp and /var/log, for performance reasons.<br><br>Anyhow, SF-LUG is welcome to use my machine's facilities as long as it<br>wants, but I anticipate that we'll want to move it to SF-LUG's _own_<br>machine in good time.  I just wanted to reassure you that 10 hours of <br>downtime is something of an outlying case, but is within expectation for<br>storm season and nothing to get alarmed about.  Because uncle-enzo is <br>_my_ principal home on the Internet, I am motivated (and able) to bring<br>it back up within about a day somewhere, no matter what happens -- root<br>compromise, hard drive failures,
 whatever.<br><br>[1] Get a load of these 31337 specs:  single-proc PIII/500, 256kB PC100<br>SDRAM, 2 x 9GB SCSI-2 HDs.  Go, me!<br><br>[2] See:  "XFS Conversion" on http://linuxmafia.com/kb/Filesystems/ .<br><br>[3] In fact, I really should swap in a slightly better machine and two<br>less ridiculously small and old hard drives, that is waiting.  I just<br>haven't had time to do the swaparound.<br><br>-- <br>Cheers,             <br>Rick Moen                 "Anger makes dull men witty, but it keeps them poor."<br>rick@linuxmafia.com                                   -- Elizabeth Tudor<br><br>_______________________________________________<br>sf-lug mailing list<br>sf-lug@linuxmafia.com<br>http://linuxmafia.com/mailman/listinfo/sf-lug<br></blockquote><br></div><p>
                <hr size=1>Yahoo! Photos<br> 
Ring in the New Year with <a href="http://us.rd.yahoo.com/mail_us/taglines/photos/*http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph//page?.file=calendar_splash.html&.dir=">Photo Calendars</a>. Add photos, events, holidays, whatever.